Love – by Andrés Moya

You say love is a superior feeling. In what sense?

It’s not strictly a superior feeling if one follows the line suggested by Jonas, where all the manifestations of the spirit are something which keeps developing throughout the history of life. We can dissect the amorous phenomenon throughout that history. Love carries, . . . → Read More: Love – by Andrés Moya

Death – by Andrés Moya

How about death?

First, there’s a question: life is very persistent. From the point of view of personal self-awareness, a conflict is generated because one is aware of one’s own limitations in the sense that, sooner or later, we disappear. Well, I, as a finite being, disappear, but my heritage can go . . . → Read More: Death – by Andrés Moya

Free will – by Andrés Moya

You claim we are aware of freedom, time and death.

The subject of freedom is key. It’s fundamental because it has to do with science itself, in the sense of whether we’re going to be able to give an explanation of its existence or not. I don’t have a criterion set in . . . → Read More: Free will – by Andrés Moya

Consciousness – by Andrés Moya

The awareness of oneself is self-awareness.

I call these properties self-awareness. I think we have particularities compared to other species. I’ll go back to the evolutionary frame. Every species has its own characteristics. When one see the tree of life, one sees that, if species are created, it’s because they have developed . . . → Read More: Consciousness – by Andrés Moya

Life – by Andrés Moya

For a biologist, the question of what life is seems capital, but it could be posed from pure biology or from individuality.

That’s true. The definition of what can be understood by life is complicated. From the more philosophical, conceptual point of view, there’s a certain idea that the vital phenomenon is . . . → Read More: Life – by Andrés Moya

God – by Andrés Moya

You ask yourself questions that may be considered metaphysical and you add a reflection: what is the meaning of doing that from the evolutionary perspective?

To what extent is one capable of formulating certain questions and, once the answers have been obtained, reach the conclusion that it may not make a lot . . . → Read More: God – by Andrés Moya

The future – by Andrés Moya

This presupposes the idea of progress

I don’t have a clear opinion about this, but it may seem -because of what I’m going to say- that I state there’s a certain progress in the dynamics of our own species, in the dynamics of biological evolution itself. Whether we are a contingent product . . . → Read More: The future – by Andrés Moya

The meaning of life – By Andrés Moya

In your last book you say scientists are prone to melancholy.

We are used to thinking about the optimistic or positive component associated to scientific discovery. That version of the positive science who is happy with discovery is real. But, when one places what discovery in science means into context, the unraveling . . . → Read More: The meaning of life – By Andrés Moya

An interview with Andrés Moya

In your last book you say scientists are prone to melancholy.

We are used to thinking about the optimistic or positive component associated to scientific discovery. That version of the positive science who is happy with discovery is real. But, when one places what discovery in science means into context, the unraveling . . . → Read More: An interview with Andrés Moya

The future – by Juan-Ramón Capella

What future awaits us?

We can expect for some peoples to eat more. In China, now, one billion more people are eating. I trust in Latin America things will go better, in Africa those terrible problems will end. We have the ecological problem before us, the substitution of oil. Everything goes . . . → Read More: The future – by Juan-Ramón Capella